ClearWay Minnesota(SM) announces new research grants - Applied Clinical Trials

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ClearWay Minnesota(SM) announces new research grants Studies will explore tobacco cessation, smoke-free policies and secondhand smoke exposure


ClearWay Minnesota(SM) announces new research grants

Studies will explore tobacco cessation, smoke-free policies and secondhand smoke exposure

PR Newswire

MINNEAPOLIS, May 21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Today, ClearWay Minnesota's Board of Directors approved five new research grants. The grant awards, which total more than $974,000, will examine topics including tobacco cessation among African American smokers, various smoke-free policies and secondhand smoke exposure among children.

The grant recipients are the University of Minnesota, the Center for Energy and Environment and the Public Health Law Center.

"We have one of the best state-focused tobacco research grant-making programs in the country," said ClearWay Minnesota Chief Executive Officer David Willoughby. "This new research will help to identify techniques to reduce tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure among the people of our state."

The five grants, totaling $974,483, were awarded to:

  • The University of Minnesota, for Efficacy of Electronic Cigarette Alone and in Combination With Nicotine Patch Among African American Menthol Smokers – This three-year research project, not to exceed $499,998, will examine the use of menthol-flavored e-cigarettes, alone and in combination with nicotine patches, among African American smokers attempting to quit smoking. This study will contribute to the body of evidence on e-cigarettes the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seeks to collect as it considers regulations for e-cigarettes. The Principal Investigator is Kola Okuyemi, M.D., M.P.H.
  • The Center for Energy and Environment, for Research to Measure Secondhand Smoke in Vehicles This two-year research project, not to exceed $100,000, will measure secondhand smoke components in vehicles under various conditions. The Principal Investigator is David Bohac, P.E.  
  • The Public Health Law Center, for Adult Foster Care: Smoke-Free Challenges and Opportunities – This 17-month research project, not to exceed $125,000, will explore policy options for providing smoke-free environments in foster care settings for mentally or physically impaired adults. The Principal Investigator is Kerry Cork, J.D.
  • The University of Minnesota, for Impact of Smoke-Free Policy Implementation in Public Housing Buildings – This 15-month research project, not to exceed $124,616, will examine how the introduction of a smoke-free policy in subsidized housing affects residents' attitudes, behaviors and exposures. The Principal Investigators are Deborah Hennrikus, Ph.D., and Rachel Widome, Ph.D., M.P.H.
  • The University of Minnesota, for Concurrent Childhood Screening for Lead and Tobacco Smoke Exposure at Well-Child Visits – This two-year research project, not to exceed $124,869, will explore new methods for promoting smoking cessation among parents and protecting children from secondhand smoke exposure. The Principal Investigator is Anne Joseph, M.D., M.P.H.

"Minnesota researchers continue to be in the vanguard for reducing tobacco's harm," said Willoughby. "ClearWay Minnesota is proud of the role we play in creating knowledge that will help individuals and communities across Minnesota and ultimately around the country."

About ClearWay MinnesotaSM
ClearWay Minnesota is an independent nonprofit organization that improves the health of Minnesotans by reducing the harm caused by tobacco. ClearWay Minnesota serves Minnesota through its grant-making program, QUITPLAN ® stop-smoking services and statewide outreach activities. It is funded with 3 percent of the state's 1998 tobacco settlement. For more information on ClearWay Minnesota or QUITPLAN Services, call 952-767-1400 or visit clearwaymn.org.

SOURCE ClearWay Minnesota

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