Top Facial Plastic Surgeon Reveals New Vertical Neck Lifting Procedure in May Issue of Leading Facial Plastic Surgery Journal - Applied Clinical Trials

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Top Facial Plastic Surgeon Reveals New Vertical Neck Lifting Procedure in May Issue of Leading Facial Plastic Surgery Journal


Top Facial Plastic Surgeon Reveals New Vertical Neck Lifting Procedure in May Issue of Leading Facial Plastic Surgery Journal

PR Newswire

NEW YORK, May 6, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- In an article published in the May 2014 issue of Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America , Andrew Jacono, M.D., F.A.C.S., director of the New York Center for Facial Plastic and Laser Surgery, reveals his signature vertical neck lift surgery.

Before & After of patient who has undergone Vertical Neck Lift

The article details Dr. Jacono's technique, an extended deep plane facelift in which the neck skin and its underling muscles (the SMAS-platysma complex that extends from the lower jaw area to the collarbone) are elevated as a composite unit and lifted in an anti-gravitational vertical direction. The goal is to redrape the excess muscle and skin vertically onto the face (rather than horizontally) to create a natural and crisp jawline. With age, the muscles of the neck slacken and droop beneath the skin, resulting in what many of Dr. Jacono's patients refer to as "turkey neck."

There are three points of difference with this neck lift technique as detailed in the publication. First, the skin and underlying muscles are not separated as in a traditional necklift. It is a deep plane lift so the layer under the muscle is lifted and the tightening effect comes from deep under the muscles. Since the skin is never peeled back from the face, the skin never looks 'tight' and plastic. Second, the vertical elevation of the drooping neck prevents pulling of the corner of the mouth and eye that occurs with traditional necklifts that tighten horizontally. Third, the vertical neck lift extends the deep plane surgery lower into the neck than has ever been accomplished before in plastic surgery. This allows for more tightening of the platysma muscle that causes the vertical muscle bands and cords in the drooping neck.  This extension makes the necklift last longer and limits the need for other procedures to further tighten the neck (such as neck liposuction and middle platysma tightening).

"For patients with 'turkey neck,' or significant sagging of the neck and jowls as a result of aging, I recommend this minimally invasive procedure as the best option for a dramatic yet natural-looking result without the tautness that has come to be associated with neck lifting procedures in recent years," says Dr. Jacono. "While there are certainly a number of non-surgical facelift procedures available for patients with only subtle signs of aging, they won't correct more droopy necks. In these cases, a neck lift is the only solution for a permanent result. It's important to tighten the support system of the neck in a natural way so that it cannot fall again, but doesn't look 'done.'"

Because the procedure requires only incisions behind the ears, it leaves no visible scars, with minimal bruising and swelling since the procedure is performed beneath the muscle, causing less trauma to the skin. This is of particular note in light of the findings from the most recent survey by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS). According to the results of the 2013 AAFPRS Membership Study, 71 percent of plastic surgeons surveyed reported that patients are most concerned about recovery time when making a decision to undergo facial plastic surgery, and 25 percent reported visible scarring as a top concern.

The surgery lasts about 1.5 hours, and healing time is about one week, depending on the patient. The cost of a vertical neck lift  ranges from 15 to 20 thousand dollars.

About Dr. Andrew Jacono
A Dual Board Certified, Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon, Dr. Andrew Jacono is a face and neck lift expert with offices in Manhattan and Great Neck, New York. A Castle Connolly Top Doctor, Dr. Jacono is also Section Head of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at North Shore University Hospital Manhasset, Assistant Clinical Professor, Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and Director of The New York Center for Facial Plastic & Laser Surgery in New York, New York. He recently released his second book, titled The Face of the Future , and he is the creator of J PAK SYSTEMS – convenient, homeopathic remedies to help optimize healing after aesthetic injectable and surgical procedures. 

With surgical privileges at six New York area hospitals, as well as an extensive background in Head and Neck Surgery with subspecialty training in Facial Plastic Surgery, Dr. Jacono is recognized amongst his peers for his innovative surgical techniques and skills. He has authored numerous manuscripts and published articles in leading plastic surgery journals on a variety of surgical techniques, including minimally invasive endoscopic facial plastic surgery. His clinical research has been presented at countless plastic surgery meetings and symposiums all over the world. To learn more about Dr. Jacono and his practice, visit www.newyorkfacialplasticsurgery.com.

Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140505/84548

SOURCE New York Center for Facial Plastic and Laser Surgery

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