Synteract Launches Rare Disease Institute

February 28, 2020

Applied Clinical Trials

Synteract, a CRO partnering with biotech and pharma companies to bring new medicines to market, has launched the Synteract Rare Disease Institute. The program incorporates lectures, webinars, interactive discussions, videos, and industry literature. The Synteract Rare Disease Institute will cover a wide variety of topics including patient perspectives, bioethics, regulatory requirements, customer engagement, patient advocacy and more.

Derek Ansel, Director, Rare, Orphan, and Pediatrics, who leads the program, says, “I’m thrilled to announce the creation of the Synteract Rare Disease Institute, designed specifically for rare and orphan diseases. Our goal has been to provide a comprehensive rare disease program that spans from disease indications, innovative delivery models, to patient perspectives. The Synteract Rare Disease Institute gives our employees a foundation in rare disease development and encourages proactive understanding and exploration of this growing area of clinical research.”

Synteract’s history of working with pioneering biotech companies aided the natural evolution of the institute. Synteract has considerable experience working on rare and orphan disease projects, which enables the cultivation and expansion of offerings designed to meet the needs of its biotech partners.

Vice President for Rare, Orphan and Pediatrics Lisa Dilworth adds, “The deployment of the Synteract Rare Disease Institute signifies our corporate commitment to achieving excellence and maintaining quality in the rare disease area. This program builds on the passion and dedication our employees have demonstrated for rare disease research while fostering collaboration and innovation from the executive level to the end user.

As trials in rare disease have seen rapid acceleration in recent years, Synteract’s Rare Disease Institute has been established to meet the growing needs of the clinical research industry and of the patients who suffer from rare diseases.”

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