TCG updates hardware to better determine which drugs are successful in CNS trials

February 18, 2010

Company News Release

The Cognition Group (TCG) has updated its hardware for the Signal Enhancement System (SES). This technological enhancement will allow patient interviews to be recorded and viewed in a more precise, higher quality format and will further improve international clinical trials.

Clinical trials in the Central Nervous System (CNS) have been riddled with human error as long as they have existed. Problems include inconsistent or biased ratings, patients with incorrect diagnoses participating in the study, or even rating of the wrong interview. All of these issues have decreased the signal in CNS clinical trials.

SES is a system that resolves these issues through interview quality control, study assessment standardization, and scale rating integrity at the investigating sites. The system, which has been used in CNS clinical trials for the last three years, not only ensures that interviews are conducted according to protocol, but also facilitates expert and consensus ratings.

Data presented at recent conferences show that the SES controls for raters' enrollment bias and expectancy bias while ensuring that patients with the correct diagnosis are entered into the study. It addresses in-study rater variance by identifying raters’ nonconformity to pre-set rating standards, consequently enhancing data quality. The technology's strength is based on more focused patient evaluation and controlled impact of inconsistent rater performance on trial outcomes.

Recently, TCG has updated all of its hardware that it distributes to sites by replacing all of its laptops with a newer model; adding a 180 degree, higher pixel motion-detecting camera; and including a USB microphone that can record conversation up to 50 feet away. “We are very excited about this update,” said Subhash Goswami, Chief Operating Officer of TCG. “SES has revolutionized the way in which CNS clinical trials are conducted. Updating the hardware allows us to further improve the industry standards and greatly reduce errors in clinical trials.”

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