Spectratox Drug Phototoxicity Collaboration Celebrates 25 Years

March 1, 2011

Company News Release

The staffs of Chiltern International Limited (Chiltern), a global contract research organization (CRO), and Spectratox Limited, celebrate the 25 year mark of their successful collaboration in Drug Phototoxicity.
Chiltern Early Phase and Spectratox have worked together using a validated and regulatory accepted in vivo human study method for the assessment of drug phototoxicity. The history of this collaboration can be traced through their multiple publications in peer reviewed journals.

“The success story of this methodology is not just measured in publications,” stated Dr Brian Sanderson, Medical Director, Chiltern Early Phase. “It is measured in the success we have had in helping new drugs continue their developmental journey for areas of therapeutic need.”

Professor James Ferguson, Head of the Academic Department of Dermatology, University of Dundee, and CEO of Spectratox, explained, “The evolution of randomized controlled trials has been in response to industry and regulatory requirements. Our trials, which tend to be conducted prior to Phase III, produce data that defines the phototoxic risk in man in terms of severity and causal wavelengths as well as providing an understanding of the likelihood of ocular phototoxicity. Where phototoxicity is found, advice on protective measures to enable future development of the compound is an important aspect of our work.”

Dr Sanderson added, “New study designs have been introduced to act as initial “screening” in man for drugs with potential phototoxicity. The new designs have evolved in response to the growing demand to assess this earlier in clinical drug development. The benefits are savings in both time and cost whilst remaining scientifically robust.”

Glenn Kerkhof, Chiltern CEO, commented, “This 25 year collaboration is cause for celebration when we look back and realize the successes reached as well as what is presently being accomplished together. We very much look forward to what the next 25 years will bring in advancing drug development processes.”

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